Wild-Animal Suffering Research has merged with Utility Farm to create Wild Animal Initiative.  Wild Animal Initiative works to understand and improve the lives of animals in the wild.

Research

Intervention Report: Wildlife Contraception

Abstract Although wildlife contraception is under-researched and many specific details are highly uncertain, wildlife contraception has the potential to robustly improve animal welfare in a cost-effective way. Two forms of wildlife contraception, immunocontraception and ContraPest, are discussed. The use of ContraPest by individuals is not recommended at this time, pending further study. Immunocontraception is ready…

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Wildlife Contraception

Abstract Although wildlife contraception is under-researched and many specific details are highly uncertain, wildlife contraception has the potential to robustly improve animal welfare in a cost-effective way. Two forms of wildlife contraception, immunocontraception and ContraPest, are discussed. The use of ContraPest by individuals is not recommended at this time, pending further study. Immunocontraception is ready to be deployed by wildlife managers, but due to regulatory and other issues few populations are currently managed using wildlife contraception. The creation of an advocacy movement to support the use of wildlife contraception is briefly discussed. How It Works There are two primary forms of contraception that are both effective in wildlife and acceptable from a welfare perspective: immunocontraception and ContraPest. Immunocontraception Immunocontraception uses […]

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Intervention Report: Feeding Wildlife As A Means of Promoting Welfare

Abstract Wildlife contraception prevents wild animals– mostly mammals, although sometimes birds– from having offspring. In addition to preventing human-wildlife conflict and ecological damage with less suffering than lethal control does, wildlife contraception may improve survival and increase longevity. Several forms of contraception, including hormonal contraception, surgical sterilization, and immunocontraception, have been developed. Expanding research into contraception may be one of the most effective ways to help wild mammals and perhaps birds. Why Use Contraception On Animals? There are two primary uses of wildlife contraception to promote wild-animal welfare. First, people may wish to limit populations for some reason, and contraception may be the most welfare-promoting means of achieving that goal. Most obviously, wildlife contraception is used in zoos and aquariums […]

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Blog

Announcing Wild Animal Initiative

Introduction This intervention report reviews the evidence on supplemental feeding of wild animals. You can read a detailed literature review of the evidence in the paper “Feeding Wildlife As A Means of Promoting Welfare” This paper uses the Five Domains/Five Freedoms framework, which is commonly used to assess the welfare of both domestic and wild animals. The Five Domains are as follows: Nutrition (e.g. food, water, dietary quality) Environment (e.g. temperature, odors, noises, light, level of environmental variety) Health (e.g. disease, injury, functional impairment) Behavior (e.g. sleep, sex, exploration, foraging, novel challenges, play, rearing young) Affective state (e.g. pleasure/pain, comfort/discomfort, anger/calmness, boredom/engagement, loneliness/sociality, exhaustion/energy). Some species are far more likely to be studied than other species. Nearly all studies were […]

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Biannual Project Evaluation - T2, 2018

Today, we are pleased to announce that Wild-Animal Suffering Research (WASR) and Utility Farm (UF) are merging together to form a new organization focused solely on wild animal welfare — Wild Animal Initiative. Over the last year, we (Wild-Animal Suffering Research and Utility Farm) have become increasingly aware that our work overlaps significantly, and that our values are well aligned. Because of this, a merger seemed like the natural next step for our organizations. We drafted a merger plan, sought feedback from our teams and external members of the EAA community and our respective Boards. All were broadly supportive of our decision. This new organization will be better suited to coordinate research and academic outreach, and incorporates lessons that have […]

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Biannual Project Evaluation - T1, 2018

Summary This evaluation looks at our progress during the second six months (“T2”) of 2018 and assesses the extent to which our activities have allowed us to make progress towards our strategic goals. As our team worked very few hours during this evaluation period, this document is considerably briefer than our previous evaluation. This evaluation does not include our plans for 2019 as these are still being developed. We hope to release these in a separate post in the coming weeks. In our T1, 2018 evaluation we wrote: “Our priorities for T2, 2018 include: (1) continuing our research, (2) finalising the first round of our academic outreach project, (3) running a grants competition, and (4) establishing better people management structures.” […]

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